Tag Literature

The Silver Chair: The Perseverance of Puddleglum

Earlier in this series of posts I confessed that The Horse and His Boy is my favourite of Lewis’ chronicles. Therefore it is right at the outset of this post to...

The Voyage of the Dawn Treader: Leaving Narnia

When Caspian tells Edmund and Lucy of his task aboard the Dawn Treader, he speaks of Reepicheep’s “higher hope” for their voyage: to find Aslan’s country (p433). As the Dryad...

Prince Caspian: Conflicting Stories

Similarly to The Horse and His Boy, in Prince Caspian we see the uncertain tension of life between Aslan’s victorious death and his decisive defeat of evil in the future, The...

Stop What You're Doing and Read

I recently picked up a short collection of essays titled Stop What You’re Doing and Read This! The title caught me – not to mention the bright cover – because I...

Doodle: “No One is Told Any Story but Their Own”

I concluded my previous post on Narnia by briefly touching on Aslan’s refusal to tell people any story but their own. The characters in The Horse and His Boy need...

The Horse and His Boy: Having Faith when it is Hard

The Horse and his Boy is my favourite of the series, but also many people’s least. This is due to a few reasons, of which I will highlight just two:...

Doodle: 'He's not Safe, but He's Good'

The number of times I have heard that line from C.S. Lewis’ The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the pulpit defies reason. I say this namely because I cannot remember a...

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe: From Death to Life

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is undoubtedly the most widely read and publically praised of the Narnia series. That makes writing this post harder than the previous one....

The Magician's Nephew: A Strange but Familiar God

My wife and I recently decided to work through C.S. Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia. Growing up functionally illiterate, in a non-Christian home, meant that I stumbled into Narnia as...

William Golding and Original Sin

As Lord of the Flies draws to an end, William Golding writes, "Ralph wept for the end of innocence, the darkness of man's heart." Though the story concludes with rescue,...

Three books from 2012

It is no secret: there are times when I love books more than people. Because I spend so much time reading I thought that I should offer some book suggestions,...

Out of the Silent Planet: Modernism and Malacandra

  “To you I may seem a vulgar robber, but I bear on my shoulders the destiny of the human race. Your tribal life with its stone-age weapons and beehive...